520: Joining a Startup and Thinking Globally w/ Dan Frohnen

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Dan Frohnen, VP of Marketing at Skedulo.

Looking for a guaranteed way to createcontent that resonates with your audience, Stur Te pondcast interviewyour ideal clients and let them choose the topic of the interview, because ifyour ideal clients care about the topic, there's a good chance, the rest of youraudience will care about. It too, learn more at sweetfish media, dtcom, you're, listening to the B Tob Grove,show podcast dedicated to helping be to be executives and she'd Explosive Gron.When you're looking for techniques and strategies, tools and resources, you'vecome to the right place, I'm Jonathan Green and I'm James Cargary. Let's getit into the show. Wolcome back to the B to B Groth show.Today we are joined by Dan Frownin Dan is the VP of marketing at Schedulo. DanWelcome to the show o thinks so much Johnatha' happy to be here. Oh It's apleasure to have you on the show. I'm excited to sort of share your wisdomwith our listeners today and we're ratshing me talking about this idea ofjoining a start up, but with a global focus. So you know, I think there aredefinitely going to be lizards. Get that get a lot out of today's episode,because this feels like a very unique topic to me and I'm excited to get intoit, but before we do, maybe you can tell our listeners a little about whatyou and the schedule O team are up to these days. Yeah there were up to allkinds of fun stuff, so I mean I think, like a lot of BTB marketers in in astartup. It's not a matter of Um trying to find stuff to do it's amatter of trying to prioritize all the things that need to be done, so we'rereally focused on on building kind of a solid foundation for all of ourmarketing programs and trying to be as strategic as possible. So that's a lotof building our text stack. Building our database in a smart way M, gettingtarget accounts lined up and then really focusing a lot on our kind obrand. What our value proposition is and and kind of our SEO and how we lookin the digital space, MHM Yeah Yep,...

...that's perfect and den I mean youobviously have you have some at least some familiarity with with te start uplife in the start up world, and you know I think, th. It's it's a veryattractive sort of avenue for people that have an idea. HAV A drive havepassion, maybe having found Y fit in in the corporate world. So D, just I meanjust before we kind of get into today's topic. I mean tell us a little aboutthen your experience with the startup world. Yes, I mean to your point: UmStartups really do allow you to have an immediate impact on a business,usually at a startup. There's too many things to do and not enough people todo them, so it really takes a person who who wants to be strategic? Who, whowants to focus on something and wants to drive something home with withlittle to no direction. So I think you know for people that are early in theircareer, it's a great place to learn what specialty you might want and forsomeone that's later in their career, I think m. There myself included, mightkind o be start up, junkies that enjoy going into a business and really havingthat that early impact and being very close to to leadership and investors and and really just um doingit from the groundup yeah feels like it can really run the Gamit. I mean whereyou are agewise, where you are professionally.You know if it's, if it's a good fit, it's a good fit. So absolutely so, Ithink, there's I think, thereis going to be a lot of listeners that get valueout of today's topic again joining a start up, but with an Ey towards thissort of global focus. So Damn, why don't you sort of take it away? Whatare we going to be talking about today, so I mean today M, and this is veryunique to schedule O, but I think that some of your listeners might have thisas well is that Schedulo was born out of m an Australian company, so it wasfounded in Brisben back in twent and thirteen, and that was the firstaddressable market and then they...

...expanded to the? U S, so I haven'tnaturally built in Um thirty somen ond percent of my revenue coming out ofthat region. So when I, when I came in it, wasn't a matter of if I was goingto be thinking globally, it was a matter of I absolutely have to Um. Soreally what I, what I did from the Getko was really M, not looking allover our data and all of our marketing programs from the highest level. I hadto break it out by region as well as my channel and and all that fun, stuff andand really when you dig into the data th. The differences between the twomarkets are so drastically different that I'm actually running too verydistinctly different marketing programs. As a result, yeah, and- and so I knowthat one of the sort of one of the points that we were goingto make todayis this idea that not all regions are created. Equally, YOU WAN to learn.What's working, what isn't I mean? Can you break that down a little bit for me?Yeah, I mean to me. It started with just purely where the leads coming fromwhere's the pipeline coming from. Where is the revenue coming from, and thething that I immediately saw for for our particular businesses that our ourApac business was very much driven by partners and and a couple really key goto market things while our? U S, business was whuch much more diverseand a mixture of partner, as well as a lot of marketing channels so m. How Iinvest my time and effort an each origin region is drastically different,an for the? U S I won't. I won't necessarily be trying to to get a PRagency right away, because I have some more fundamental demand things to do inin Apac, where we have kind of a really suscict to go tomarket strategy. I'm actually going to hire a PAPR agency and get moreinvolved in that conversation and whipped e fast forse, so it was really.It was interesting for me is a marketer to come in here and think that I wasgoing to do one thing and then, by looking at that, dayto realize that Iwas actually going to be doing something that I didn't think I wasgoing to be doing yep yeah, and so...

...would you say that was kind of the mostimportant factor for you in terms of making those decisions, you kind ofindicated you go in with with certain expectation. So would you say that thone of the more important factors in in making those decisions, learning what'sworking and what isn't planning accordingly is is like keeping an eyeon the data is, is not being so married to the idea that you have to do it thisway. 'cause it worked in a certain region. I mean. How did you sort ofmake those distinctions man, I think, there's. Definitely youknow for forthe Dato driven marketers out there. It's it's definitely thedata, but then it's also talking to the leadership within the business as welland and really understanding from sales leadership in each region. What they'redoing how it's working, what their take is on the market and then obviously thecustomers too and learning how those customers found you in the first placeand then how you can communicate to them and find more of them yea perfect.So all right, so that that's point number O, not all regions are created.EAGELLY point number two: When you are sort of joining a start up with thisglobal focus, lay the foundation first, what what do you mean by that Dan? So Ithink a lot of times. You know when you step into a new role, whether it'sinternally moving around or or starting a new business. I think it's almosttime for a marketer to want to ustoly prove themselves and I think theopposite neengs to happen. You actually need to sit back. You need to Um,listen a lot, not talk as much and then really focus on on lane that foundationand that foundation to me is really your hypothesis about the business andand some key test that you're going to do within that business to prove outwhether what you've been hearing and what you hypothesize as a result ofthose learnings is actually something that's going to work and and drive yourgo to market strategy, and you know in addition to that, I think really Bei tobe marketing in particular when, when you're so heavily relying on a databaseand and a marketing technology stack,...

...it's it's. It's smart to take that timewhere you are listening and hypothesizing and make sure that yourtech is working in th t, your database is going to be working too so that whenyou do scale everything that it's just ready to fire on all cylinders, MHM andpoint number three I mean after you've laid the foundation you're saying. Okay,now is the time to start out strategically. What what do we mean bythat? So I mean I, you know I could go to a white board right now and draw upten things that I want to do and even this morning there was ten things on myto do list, but I knew that there was the one or two things that I absolutelyhad to get done before noon today or I would not be winning myday. So I think that the same thing has to has to be said for your entiremarketing strategy. There's the nice to have in the must have so you absolutelyhave to start out with that high level, strategic vision, it's okay, to compileall the things that you want, but at the end of the day you you really haveto to have the mind frame, particularly in a start up and one where you mightbe servicein. Multiple region is where it's not about the volume, necessarilyas it is about the results in the strategy behind it. And do you have anyadvice for our listeners. I mean as they're as they're, trying to okay,like you said, there's, there's always a million things to do. There's notenough time there's enough hours in the day you know you're, looking at youknow, conceptiually high conceptually. What are we trying to accomplish arethe things that we're doing. Mapping to that result. Do you have any advice onon how to prioritize the stuff that is the wantado versus the must do ye to me?I think it's it's a matter of really aligning with the rest of leadership inin the business and making sure that Kno, if your, if your head of sales,has a priority that you clearly understand that and that it does alignto the higher business goals that evilign to your board of directors ifthey have priorities as well as your CEO and and really it's a mixture ofyou know. If the CEO wants something and they've said it more than once,then typically I'm going to cater to...

...that. If I truly believe that it's somethingthat doesn't need to happen, then I a'll continue to have a conversation,but at the end of the day it's got to be a mixture of of kind of core thingsthat that a marketer knows that business needs from a data standpointfrom their learnings, but then also taking sure that you've gotten yourleadership byin and that th they've had a voice so that they buy int everythingas well. Well, N, it definitely sound sounds like a a corner. Stone of thatis. This is just KINDOF. This idea of communication that you know you you'recommunicating what you need with the other teams to make sure y 'rethey're they're aligned, they're communicating with you. Everyone issort of communicating with the higher ups. I mean you just have to have thatopen line of Communication. Exactly, I think, a lot of times you knowmarketers in particular, are not only seen as Um. You know people who arepropoing a brand but they're theyre. They have a seat at the revenue tableas well. So I think that being said, it's it's just more and more incumbentupon had it marketing to to really open thelines of communication. If there is any kind of Um confusion on what thestrategy is or why something's happening to to fully explain that andhave an agreement early as possible so that there's no misconception on whatthe priorities are mm. Perfect, perfect, all right! So Yo! U Know You've Laiedthe foundation you're starting out strategically point number four spendtime getting to know your customers. I mean part of this part of this feels Um.You know very intuitive, but you know obviously the fact that we're heretalking about it means that not everyone is doing it or not. Everyoneis doing it well. So what would you say? Is You know this? This idea of spendingspending time getting ow, O your customers and, what's the mostimportant, takeaway h, the big thing is just to you know as as be to bemarketing is, is evolving n and I think the majority of us would now say thatif you can find an advocate, that will tell your story. That's a customer thatwins nine times out of ten. Just...

...writing a value prop on a piece ofpaper and saying believe us so to me in order to become the best that you canfor your brand, it's about knowing those customers, it's about knowingthose customer stories, it's about being able to pick up the phone andhave twenty thirty customers in the field that just love your your brandand what it does for their business beyond measure that you can constantlybounce ideas off of and and really um stay as close to the front line aspossible. So they can kind of continue to to do what's best for them an andenvolve your your messaging and your product, and I think, Um you knowspending the early days doing that. Well, just make your marketing all theall the much better yeah yeah. Well I mean, and obviously those are the thoseare, the people that you're ultimately serving and I and if they're not happy,I mean you're, not you're, not doing your job right and if you're, you know,we've had guests on the show that talk about. If, if your customers aren'tyour biggest advocates, you're you're you're leaving money on the table, so Ilike this idea of connecting with your customers, getting to know them toconsistently improve your product and Oour Service hobut on the other side,Dan is there? What would you say? Is there any advice in terms of taking the customers that are yourbiggest advocates and how to get that message in front of people that youwould like to turn into customers yeah, I mean so to me Um one of the thingsthat I've been trying to do and doing somewhat well at schedule. O early onis aligning with our customer success team and, as they are out talking tocustomers and creating a a really nice kind of customer first program isinjecting some of some of the things that a marketing organization wouldneed into those conversations which is you know, do you want a contributed,thought leadership? VR blog. Do you WANTTA be a part of a Webbon art thattalks about your successes? Do you want to do a tase study? Do you want toreference US and speak to other customers? Would you like toparticipate in field events where we...

...host dinners and and be a thoughtleaderjust really getting them involved M in the business and giving them anopportunity to get their name out there and kind of as a thought leadership inthe space that that were Yeh perfect all right, appoint number five: Let'stalk about higher fast higher smart. What does that mean yea? So to me Um. Ithink, and I can speak from experiences- it'svery easy to kind of come in and get Um inclosed by the four walls and andstart trying to execute on everything. If you, if you are't a start up- andyou do have budget and and head count, spend theearly days hiring the best people that you can and and realize that if youdon't do one or two projects that aren't on the top of you're to do listthat it's not going to be the end of the world, because if you do have thebest people with you and there to help build the team with you,you're going to be better off n in the long run yeah. You know. Certainly, fora maybe this, maybe this is more applicable to sort of a bootstrap startup. I mean you know 'cause. There are definitely startup that have the moneyand the resources to hire fast higher smart. They don't have to do it allthemselves. I mean. Would you say that the the benefits still outweigh thedrawback of Hey? You know we're barely making ends me, but we still need tobring someone on. Do we just sort of roll the dice and say? Well, you knowwhat we're Gonta we're Gong ta suck up the cost, because we need this personand they're worth he the extra money or you know, do we need to keep doing thisourselves until we're in a more financially stable place? Are we evergoing to get into financially stable place to even have the money later on?If we don't do it, I mean what would your thoughts be on that yeah? I mean.That's, that's a good question. I think, with every position you hire, thereshould be an ry discussion involved to make sure that you, you are gettingsome sort of return on investment, whether it's tied to pipeline, whetherit's tie to customer satisfaction, whether it's tie to closed one business,and I would also encourage everyone-...

...that's listening to also think aboutcontractors as well. So for us you know, I don't. I don't need to hire someoneto run my marketing operations right now. I can have a consultant do thatthat cuts down on our overhead. I don't need someone to to run our websitefulltime. I can have a contractor doing that. So it's really thinking aboutwhat you truly need and that's going to drive the most oralive versus where youcan contract and and save the business onl overhead Yep, absolutely Dan. Thishas been some fantastic content. I think that our listeners are going toget a tremendous amount of value out of it if any. If anyone listening actuallywants to, you know sort of fall up with you and learn more about today's topic.They Wan to learn more about SCHEDULEO. What's the best way for them to goabout doing that, so a few different ways you could either email me at d,Ronon Frohnn at Schedulo tcom. You could find me on Linken at DanielFronin or twitter at Daniel Frorit and I'm Hav to respond to any of thoseexcellent. Damn thinks again. So much for your time is the pleasure havingyou on the show today. Thank you. So much if you've been getting value from thispodtast O can help us reach more people by reviewing the show on Itunes, here'show you can leave a review in less than a minute open your pod cast out and tapthe search icon in the bottom ray corner type in fee tob growt thenselect our show once you're. There tap te reviews to have and tell us what youthink of the show. These reviews help us out of time. Thank you so much forlistening until next time.

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