B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 2064 · 6 months ago

4 Steps to Build Your Content Marketing Processes

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Dan Sanchez shares 4 s teps to building out a solid content marketing process.

Yeah, Hi everyone, welcome back to be to begrowth. I'm Olivia Hurley with Sweet fish Media and today I'm joined by ourvery own dan Sanchez, Director of Audience Growth. How you doing dan? I'mdoing well. Thanks Olivia. Oh, awesome. So today I wanted to peel back thecurtain a little bit and look at sweet fish itself um and talk with you aboutcontent creation and how you are building the plane while flying it asthe expression goes. So to jump right in, what are you currently doing tocreate content at Sweet Fish Media were certainly well known for podcasting.It's kind of our thing. We have this show that you're even listening toright now and we're also well known for are linked in content and that's wherea lot of people discover BtB growth is because we are prolific creatingcontent for linked in all the time. So those have been our primary twochannels for years now. We're also slowly and surely building up our S E.O. Contents. We still think um that search engine optimization, thatranking on google is still a big part of B two B marketing. So while we'restill improving BTB growth for podcasting linked in, we're also takingon extensive blogging. So why would you want to build an infrastructure forcontent? What would this allow you to do? Infrastructure is to me vitalbecause otherwise you're just kind of winging it all the time and that justslows things down. I've just worked at so many different places agencies eventhat were like the experts, all the experts were in one room and it justtook forever to get a single blog post done because there is no system orstructure in order to get it done. No, like this is what a blog post shouldlook like every time it was just kind of everything was starting from scratchum which made it so you can only publish a blog poster to a week andthat's just not fast enough if everything has to be checked so closelybecause we're not even sure what we're checking for every time, then it justslows the whole process down. And that's what creating systems andprocesses are for is really speed. So you can do a much larger volume ofcontent. There's a bit of a debate out there in the content marketing worldand they say like, oh quality is more important than quantity and I'm likewhat? No, it's the other way around quantity before quality. I'm like, it'sa debate, we go back and forth on it, on linkedin all the time. James and I,and most of the sweet, that's the rest of the sweet fish Media team are on thequantity side. We believe that doing more content is better because it willlead to better quality and that's a big part of why process and why buildinggood infrastructure is so important so that you can deliver actually at aconsistently high quality while still putting out the quantity. And that'swhy I get passionate about it because...

I'm not, I'm not okay with just a blogpost a week. I'm not okay with just even a few Blinken posts today. I'mlike, well, I'm a marketer if we want to grow more and want to grow fasterthan more content is the answer, as long as it has a certain qualitystandard that you're trying to hit. Yeah, so tell me a little bit moreabout the cadence of quantity, how often do you think you should beputting out content? Um, so it's a little bit different for every channel.Every channel has like a rhythm to it and what can be considered too littleor too much um With podcasting like once a week is really the minimum. Wecertainly have customers that are doing every other week and I I'm always ontheir heels for that because it's like it's just too little, it's like theminimum. But honestly we do a daily show here at G. D. P. Growth and thereason why the be like our show is so large is because we have such a crazyvolume of episodes. I mean we've been open for 66 years. We have over 2000episodes and that's generated over four million downloads and then an averageof 100 160,000 downloads a month. It's because of the volume or daily showoften multiple times a day with podcasting. I'm assumed. I think oncewe probably hit like if we were consistently doing more than two a day,that would probably be too much. And if we were consistently doing that andstill had more to push, I'd probably launch another podcast. Um, and stilldo more. Like I would just launch more channels and just segmented out more.If GDP growth couldn't handle all the content we could possibly put into it,which we've gotten to that point before and then we've had to scale back atsome point to just be, to be growth. We've had up to five podcasts, but at atime, so you can always make more channels and more podcasts, you couldessentially be wondering who has, like dozens of podcasts, right? And thenlet's see other channels, like twitter can handle a lot Lincoln, you can onlydo so much Lincoln, you could probably do max three max four posts a day, butreally to is probably the right right amount. That's why I'm excited. Ifinally got stories, I was late to the game, everybody got in september andthen a few people like James and I were on like for the black list, we are onthe naughty list for some reason and only recently got it. I don't know whatthe heck happened linked in if you're listening to this come on. So stories,you can post a lot more as people used to consuming a lot more stories. So I'mexcited. We have that with blogging. Some people argue with me on this, butI literally think you can, You could probably get away with 20-30 posts inone website a week. If you can do it, if you can get up to that point, I'vegotten up to that point of getting just past 20 a week with one website and itmakes a huge difference. Then there's ways to do it and scale it. But it's,it's a different kind of blogging model. You're essentially creating a libraryof content rather than a subscriber base that's kind of like you'reshooting, otherwise you'd be hitting on with too many blog posts in a week.There is a way to do it and it does make a huge difference as far asbringing in a volume of content from google. Hi dan Sanchez here with aquick break from this episode, sponsor...

Vidyard. If you haven't started usingpersonal video yet to enhance your marketing campaigns, you're missing outhaving the ability to quickly capture video and record my computer screen orboth helps me not only create marketing assets faster, it makes them way morepersonable. I use personal videos and social media email blast landing pagesand even on our website, Vidyard makes it easy to record host in bed and sharevideos to more deeply engaged with your ideal buyer's prospects. Have told merepeatedly that they are blown away every time they get one for me. So signup for Vidyard free today by going to Vidyard dot com slash GDP growth. Andjust like you guys, the team at Vidyard can't keep up with all these promocodes on podcast, so they are making signing up as easy as possible. So nopromo code needed. Just go to Vidyard dot com slash GDP growth. So startusing vidyard completely free and as a bonus, get their 2021 B two B videotrans guide. Oh, well, that's awesome. Well we could deep dive right into that.But for the sake of this, this episode, curious now, what do you think thisinfrastructure that would support all of this content creation look like? Soinfrastructure looks like a couple of different pieces for me and you have toroll it out in stages and there's actually a process for buildingprocesses that I like to follow. I used to I used to hunt for this and thenfinally like an old wise sage of business who used to work at Procterand Gamble for a long time as a high up executive. Um I was in a meeting withhim when he was just there, like just blessing people with wisdom and I don'tknow what why I deserve to be in this meeting once with this dude who wasjust a wonderful and so so wise when it came to business and I wish I hadthought of the question, but somebody else asked him like what's your processfor building processes? And he like uh what he said, what came out of hismouth like like marked me for like the rest of my career because now this ismy this is it's become my process for building process and I don't know wherehe got it from. I'm sure someone wrote this down along like someone publishedthis a long time ago, Probably back in the 80s based on the kind of thelanguage of it. But since then it's been my my blueprint for buildingprocesses And it's four steps, analyze, optimize, standardize and mechanize. Solet's walk through that analyzes actually just figuring out what is yourcurrent process for executing whatever it was that if you are, are you makingblog posts, analyze what what's the current process people are using to doit. It might be a complete chaos document the chaos kind of like bulletpoint out what's currently going on And then optimize step two. How do you makeit better? What changes can be made? How do you make sure what's this,certain quality metrics you want to hit what is a good blog post? And how do weknow we hit that every time? So...

...optimize it come up with a betterprocess for doing it while you've documented what's currently going onand they're still executing according to that, right? A better version of it.And then you have to step three standardized like make sure that thepeople who are executing this day in and day out your your blogging team ormaybe just one blogger. Maybe it's just you understands the new process andthat comes with actually just writing down like step one. This is what we do.Step to like the more thoroughly you can document this and some kind of uhdatabase or even um we use train you'll hear at sweet fish but I've usedMicrosoft one note you can use Evernote you can use notion any place where youcan keep your documentation. I prefer to not keep it in google drive. I don'tknow why I just I find that things get lost in a cloud file storage like thatbut most places work well. Um so that standardized and then step formechanize what parts can you automate what parts can you just make it so thathuman doesn't have to touch it anymore. But it's gonna get done relatively well.It's not always possible to automate everything. But if you can automatesome parts it goes a long way right. Maybe you just focus on like when youpublish a blog post for example, does it get sent to all the different socialmedia sites and maybe sometimes you're customizing how you posted somethinglike linkedin like we do. But in other sites maybe you just want to get it outthere. So you just need an automation so that every time it publishes someone,a tool catches the rss feeds and then automatically just posted to twitterbecause you don't care about twitter, but at least it's being syndicatedthere. Right. Little things like that go a long way if you can automate it.So again, the four steps that I've used to do this or analyze, optimizestandardized and recognize a few other elements that I make sure that I'mbuilding along the way is making sure that I'm touching like a lot ofcommunication is happening with the team because like you said likebuilding the airplane while it's flying or like the metaphor I like to use islike changing the tires on the bus while it's running down the freeway.It's really difficult. You just don't have the luxury of just stoppingproduction and then resetting it. So there's kind of like four major thingsthat I try to look at and talk extensively with the team on at onceand they kind of focus on. The process is essentially the step by steps, thetraining like how do we, if we get new people into this position, like how dowe make sure they know everything they need to know. What are the targets?What are, what are we actually trying to shoot for? How many blog posts andhow much traffic are we expected to get from these blog posts? If we're tryingto rank on google and how much of that traffic are we trying to turn intoleads and leads into pipeline? Like what are we generally trying to shootfor? And then kPI is like, what are those things, what now that we knowwhat our targets are? What are we hoping to hit every week? Every monthso that we can kind of measure to see if we're offer on target And those are.Again, I include the team on all of those early on. So that your makingthose incremental adjustments over time. So now how are you going to build thisout or how have you been building this out? Well? And I think here's the keywhile continuing to make content...

...specifically at sweet fish. It's been achallenge that sweet fish because there's been so much change over thelast couple of months. Two months ago I was a team of one. I was a marketingdepartment of just me. I was the head of marketing. I was also the marketingspecialist, the email guy, the ceo guy, the website guy. The web webdevelopment dude. I designed my own little ads and was doing a little bitof everything is fantastic. But now I have a team of four people, Uh fiveincluding me and we're starting to get things going. Um and I had to shift alot of my priorities had to take a step back from some of the projects that Iwas working on. So some things have been going slow, like RBB podcastingcourts, which just finally launched today. I just put it out. If you'relistening to this, go check it out. Just go to sweet Fish Media dot comslash course and you can find it. Um That took a little while longer, like adelayed it a month because we had had to stop a lot of what I was doing tokind of on board the team again, because some processes had already beenput in place, but I needed to make sure to get some done sooner. And again, Itry to build out a picture of like what's ideal, like a snapshot of, likeideally, what is it, what is a great blogging strategy look like knowingthat I can't get there now, but that's where we're going to. So now that I'mworking with our blogger, I can be like, hey, this is what ideal looks like, Doyou want to help me make this? Do you want do you want to work with me tobuild this amazing blogging engine that produces fantastic results and paint apicture of what success could really look like that we're working towards.So casting vision for what a lot of these things can look like now that Ihave people over individual aspects, uh some over branding, some over Arlingtoncontent, another guy over building communities, um and trying to pit whatpaint, what the best picture looks like. We'll also incrementally week by week,building a little bit more process, getting a little bit more clear in theKPI is like, we've only been working for Uh six weeks together now andslowly, like this week or maybe next week, I'll probably have an Excel sheetwith some basic metrics that we want to track so slowly. I'm just addinginfrastructure that at the end of the day, like, I want to try to have somuch infrastructure in place that if, like I, like, God forbid I die likeeverybody knows what they need, what they need to do when they need to do itand for what reasons they need to do it and where we're all heading so thatsomebody who maybe replaces me understands what the plan was, thatmaybe they deviate from it. But uh they have something that's set up, they havean engine that's running and the reason why I like to be able to have that kindof infrastructure in places so it can run without me. It frees me up to goand build more systems for new projects. And it also just delivers predictableresults. If you have a consistent way of doing things and it deliversconsistent results, then you can kind of better forecast And make changes andmaybe forecast is like, Oh, if we're growing 10% year over year, what whattweaks can we make to the system to get...

...us to 20%. It just makes it a lotbetter. And we're taking small baby steps to be able to do that here atsweet fish. Have there been any, I guess, downfalls or cons too? Takingtime away from just building content to build out the infrastructure? Yes,there's definitely been small balls that have dropped like haven't wehaven't been producing quite as many leads as we would have hoped for sweetfish media. And so that's kind of an awkward conversation at the lead teamevery week where it's kind of like they're looking at SQL s, we haveenough like new business going on that. It's not a huge deal, but at the sametime, we all know, like, hey, if we're not bringing, don't see a certainamount of people coming in and requesting information about podcasting,uh, that eventually, that will slow our growth. And so trying to take, it'salways a balance of trying to deliver results now while also trying to buildinfrastructure so that you can go farther faster in the future. And I'mstill having conversations with that now and it's mostly like our head ofoperations who is much more aware of like finances and stuff, who is moreconcerned about that James is the visionary is kind of like, it's just aslow spot once we hit all these infrastructure, things will be golden.You know, he's just kind of like, yeah, like it'll come when it will come. Idon't want to, I don't want to do some short term things that just land as badleads that will turn later anyway. So that's a conversation. I thinksometimes you just have little things drop. Like we usually be to be growthis a daily podcast and there's been some days we've missed. We just haven'tproduced the content because well I honestly didn't record it or you didn'tget our producer the thing that she needed on time. Like I have somethingdue to her right now that I promised her it's Wednesday. I promised her onmonday and I still haven't gotten it to her. So that's going to be an episodethat got delayed because while I took more time to work on an infrastructureproject instead. So it's a lot of juggling and sometimes balls balls drophopefully nothing like Supercritical though. Yeah. Isn't there that likewell well known plastic versus glass ball analogy. Yeah, sometimes you don'tknow which ones are which until it's too late. I'm trying really hard. Yourbest guess. Yeah, totally. So understanding that long term benefitsare farther faster for building out infrastructure, what are some of theshort term benefits of building our infrastructure while continuing tobuild your content? Short term benefits? I feel like it's just for me personally,i it feels really productive. Like I hate to be the person that's alwaysfocused on the tyranny of the urgent, the things that are just happening allthe time. In fact, I'll give somewhat of a morbid story, but this story getsme, someone told me that once long ago and it's always stuck in my head, sonow I'll tell it to you and you'll never be able to forget you alreadygave the analogy or I guess the example of, well if I died. So this is yeah, solet's just let's just start, let's do some more death, write the story wentlike this. If a man walked up to a river and noticed a dead body and itlike the man naturally was alarmed and...

...went and did everything he could andpulled the body out of the river that was floating down and resuscitated theperson and got, got him back and was like oh my gosh, I'm so glad I foundyou. I was so lucky that I happen to be walking by the river at that time. Butthen he noticed something else. There was another body floating down theriver and he jumped in the river again and went to go find it and pull it out,resuscitate. And then there was another body and another body. And soon enoughlike the first person he had resuscitated started helping himpulling the bodies because body after body kept coming down the river to thepoint where the first person who was resuscitated like jumped up and saidlike I've had enough of this and goes up up the river or starts hiking up thetrail that goes goes farther along the river. Meanwhile, the guy still likefrantically pulling bodies out of the world, Why did you leave me things?Like, doesn't he see we have like we have we're saving lives, like I can'tbelieve. And then all of a sudden the bodies just stopped coming and he'slike, man, God, I don't know what, how, what happened there, I don't know whatcaused that. And the first person comes back down and so like the bridge wasout, I fixed it, right? You're like, so it's all about context. So when I'mbuilding infrastructure, I know I'm building a bridge to keep the thingsthat are urgent, necessary and usually urgent necessary because we didn't haveprocess in there before to help keep those things from happening right?Instead of chasing the tyranny of the urgent, I'm building infrastructure sothat the urgent things just don't show up anymore. But at the same time it'slike, well, bodies are coming down and like if I have a email from a customerthat's really urgent, I have to get to it at some point. Hopefully those arethe ones that I'm not like ignoring. But there's some things that while itmight be urgent to other people, I'm like, I'm like, let that one go downthe river, you know, I gotta get this bridge fixed and then it won't be aproblem in the future, right? So it's again, it's a balance. Um but it'smotivating to me knowing that I'm building things that keep the chaosfrom just flowing down the river all the time. Okay, so short term benefitis fewer dead bodies in the river, if you Yeah, and there's always somethings you can do that honestly don't take that long. That save a lot offrustration later. So you try to build like little, you try to build it inphases, little pieces at a time, like what little tiny thing can I build andlaunch that start saving us time pretty quickly and then you do little piecesat a time ultimately getting to what you know is the long term benefit, butyou don't want to work on something that takes a year if you can help it.Right? Some things you take a lot of time, like we switched projectmanagement systems, it literally took a year to roll out because we were soinvested in Terrell. Oh, and moving to a sauna for our company was like, ittook a year of planning and I'm glad we took a year to do it because it was, itwas really difficult and it went fairly having some bumps, but it went fairlysmoothly now where we work on a sauna, we don't touch trailer anymore. So somethings do take time. But honestly, there's usually things you can do thatsave you time pretty quickly. So if somebody were just starting out andthey said, oh gosh, we have all this...

...great content, but we need to build astructure for our company moving forward. Do you suggest startinglooking at analyze optimize standardized mechanized? But you alsosuggest starting with some of those short term or I guess those quick winds,like doing those things that don't take a lot of time that make things betteror longer term projects. That's a really great question. I would start1st 1st, you just need to analyze what's going on, what's the currentprocess and then it's in the optimize stage, you can write out all the thingsthat you'd like to change and have an an ideal world, but you're going toknow after building out your optimized plan which changes you want to makethat are going to take a like are just gonna take a long time and you kind ofhave to like look at the optimize all of your, your optimization plan andthink like, okay, which of all these plans, which little ones can we do nowthat have the biggest bang for our buck that save us the most time. Save us themost money, help us improve the most. Like what are the little things we canstart changing now and work into the standardized phase faster? Yeah,totally. So biggest takeaway for somebody from this episode, what do youthink? Definitely working through the analyze optimize standardized andmechanized process. The process for building process I found is tried andtrue. Um, A lot of people don't talk about it because it's just not a sexytopic. But let's be honest, we all hate being that person like dealing with thebodies coming down the river. That is never fun. Nobody likes it. So be bethe hero that goes up river and starts fixing these things. I honestly, Ipromise if you're even if your entry level, this is how you get to likedirector level. This is the difference between even a manager and a directoror manager is good at managing people and keeping those things running. But adirector, this is how a director thinks. A director is always thinking aboutprocesses and systems beyond and of course leadership and teamwork to. Buta director is directing the department by building these things. So if you'reearly in your career, you start thinking about these early, you willget way farther beyond you most of your peers because most people aren'tthinking like this. If you're director, you're probably already somewhatfamiliar with these. Hopefully this four step process kind of likesolidifies your own, you probably already have a process for this. Ifyou're a VP you've already done this before or you're really lucky. That'sright. That's awesome. Well dan, thank you so much for joining me today. Wherecan people go to connect with you and where can people go to connect to asweet fish media? So sweet fish media is always sweet fish media dot com andlinkedin. You can find me at linkedin dot com slash I. N slash digitalmarketing dan. Please shoot me A. D. M. With any questions you have from thisepisode or anything related to podcasting audience growth or don'tknow. Marketing is like my favorite thing. So I love talking shop withanybody who wants to talk about marketing. So come and find me there.That's awesome. Well thank you again...

...for joining me on the tv growth. Thanksfor having me. one of the things we've learned aboutpodcast audience growth is that word of mouth works. It works really, reallywell actually. So if you love this show it would be awesome if you texted afriend to tell them about it. And if you send me a text with a screenshot ofthe text you sent to your friend meta. I know I'll send you a copy of my book,content based networking, how to instantly connect with Anyone you wantto know. My cell phone number is (407) 490 3 3 - eight. Happy texting.

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