3 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management with Kevin Kruse

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The “hustle” isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

We’ve all heard about hustling and working hard, but what about working smart?

Billionaires like Mark Cuban and Richard Branson will tell you that time management plays a direct role in their success. From the first hour of their mornings to how they organize their calendars, they have learned how to own their day instead of letting their day own them.

In this episode, Kevin Kruse, NY Times Bestselling Author of 15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management, shares time management tips from some of the most successful billionaires in the world.

...accelerating value by proof. Analytics is the podcast for marketing, communications, sales and operations leaders who want to see their business value clearly and succeed. Learn how leaders are closing the gap between creative work and business impact through raw conversations. Don't believe me. Check out the show for yourself. From the CFO perspective, it's value is what type of revenue generation earnings, cash flow that is only adding to the growth of the of the enterprise. You know. Another dimension would be how our margins performing are we? You know, we're getting the right value by seeing margin expansion by creating products, services that are generating, You know, that incremental value to the organization. And I think from my lens, you know that it's monetary in many dimensions, right? It's not, you know, thinking about okay, what say from an employee perspective, other perspectives. But as a leader, as the finance leader, as you're looking to grow the revenue, earnings and cash flow of an organization, it will only create more opportunities for your employees, for your suppliers, for your customers, based on the services that you're creating. So to me, that's how I view to be value for more. Subscribe to the show wherever you listen to podcast. Yeah. Welcome into another episode of B2B growth. My name is Benji Block, and I want to let you know over the next few episodes we're doing something that I'm really excited about. Did you know that be to be. Growth has over 2000 episodes. In our archive. We have so much content, so much gold. And for some of you, you've just recently found the show or for those that have been around for a while. It's like, man, I didn't realize I've been listening for that long, right? Like there's just so much that we can learn from. And so I thought,...

Why don't we go back to some older episodes, Especially as we're about to head into 2022? Could we pull some things that would be really helpful for our audience? And so today I'm excited to bring you a classic episode. We sat down with Kevin Cruz And he gave us three secrets. Successful people know about time management. I know time management is something I'm personally reviewing thinking about as we head into the new year, and I thought man for some of us. I'm sure this would just be a timely conversation to revisit. So without further ado, let's jump into this conversation that we had with Kevin Cruz. Welcome back to the B to B Growth Show. We are here today with Kevin Kruse. He's a New York Times best selling author, and his last book is titled 15 Secrets. Successful people know about time management. Kevin, how you doing today, man? Doing great, James and hello, Jonathan. Thanks for having me on the show, Kevin. Thanks. Thanks for being here and really excited to chat with you, Kevin. I've actually been listening to your podcast and, uh, just getting a ton of helpful tips out of it. So I wanted to reach out to you And have you share some of these secrets from your last book with our audience. So but, Kevin, before we dive into that, I want to set some context. And you actually been in the B2B game, the bulk of your career? It sounds like and so could you tell our audience a little bit about your background and what led you to doing what you're doing? A lot of now. Yeah, that's that's a great question. And others who are less polite basically say, like, Why the Why the heck do we need another book on time management? And why did you spend your time writing it? And you're right. You know, I spent over 20 years as an entrepreneur starting and selling, Uh, some companies had several exits, and this book came from my own experience. I mean, when I was young and dumb in my twenties, you know, I really just believed it was all about the hustle.

And, you know, you want to have a little bit of hustlers, nothing wrong with hard work. But my first company, it was a small exit when I was 30 years old. You know, I built a company up to just over a million dollars in revenue, took me five years to do it. And I sold it for about $2 million. But I was working literally 80 hours a week. Sometimes more. I mean, seven days a week. I'd pull all nighters, and, you know, I was just got to that point where, yes, there was some amount of business success, but it was at a tremendous cost to my health, my relationships and looking back, I mean, how good of a boss could I have been? How good could I have been with clients when you know, I was getting four hours of sleep at night, and I slowly learned from some mentors that it's okay to work hard, but it's more powerful to work smart. And it got to the point where, with my last business, it was the exact same industry and everything. Same customers, same product base In five years. Instead of growing a million dollar business, I grew a $12 million 40 hours a week. So from 100 hours a week to about 30 hours a week, but revenue grew from a million to 12 million a year, and it's all by just changing the way I worked. And so when I sold that last company, I just decided, all right. You know, let me spend some time writing and speaking and talking to entrepreneurs and, um, time and productivity was one of the things that I, you know, thought I could help give back on. That's incredible. And so so this last book that you wrote these 15 secrets, they're not just coming out of your brain. You've tapped the shoulders of some some pretty high profile people to get their secrets. Can you tell our audience a little bit about who you sought after to to really help you and inform the content for this book? Yeah. No, it's It's great. You know, I, um there's the subtitle. The book is the craziest longest one ever. It's called...

The Productivity Habits of Seven Billionaires. 13 Olympic athletes, 29 Straight A students and 239 entrepreneurs. And so you know, there's the billionaires include, you know, Mark Cuban and Mohammadou Jews, the youngest billionaire in Africa. You know, we've got all kinds of solo preneurs, so it's not just the big ones. We've also got solo preneurs. I got working moms. I mean everything in between. But it's the largest qualitative research base. And then I interviewed four. I did a survey study of over 4000 corporate professionals to kind of inform this book. It's the first time anyone's really done a true research project on time and productivity. In this crazy age we're living in, that's good. That's good, Kevin. So I want to dive into this episode. We're going to talk about three specific things. Three of the secrets, if you will, that successful people know about time management. I think it's gonna be really helpful for our audience. B two b founders B two b sales executives Who there never seems to be enough time in the day. And so as we dive into this first one, I think it was one that Richard Branson actually told you. Can you share that that first one with us? Well, yeah. So you know, 11 of the more controversial recommendations that came out of the research is basically that ultra productive people Don't use to do lists. And I started, you know, hearing that people were not mentioning the to do list on these interviews. And as I did more research, I found one study that shows that 41% of everything we put on the to do list is never done and to do lists because of something called the Zeiger Nick effect Can lead to more stress when we know we have things to do and no plan to do them. It eats away at our subconscious, which is why we can, you know, work a 14 hour day, go home, exhausted, and then we can't fall asleep all of a sudden. Now, what ultra productive people are doing in this research base is their living from their calendar. Like just that simple task of taking all your two DUIs and picking a day, A time and a duration...

...dramatically increases the likelihood you're going to do them and reduces that stress response because your brain knows Hey, there's already a plan for that. I'm gonna take care of that Thursday at 3. 30. So you're not gonna be losing sleep over it now? You mentioned Richard Branson. Now he actually picked a fight with me over this in his blog recently. You know, he picked up on this recommendation and he's saying that he likes using his to do list, and he's obviously a billionaire. That does. And I've challenged him, uh, to a $25,000 debate. I told him I'll give the money to to Virgin Unite. He clearly doesn't need the money to his charity, and I said, Listen, give me 30 minutes, and I'm sure that I'm gonna get you to give up your to do list and start living from your calendar. And his people just got back to me yesterday saying he's reviewing my request up on the chest on his to do list. Exactly. Get back to be faster if you just live right? Right, That's also that's incredible. So So I have started recently doing this Kevin moving things from a to do list system. I was using trail Oh, you know, I got some value out of the to do list, but, like you said, like eventually, I think it worked for me for a few weeks, maybe even a month, but I eventually just stopped going to that board entre ello because I it was stressing me out the number of things that I had to do on that list. But the other thing that I've noticed from moving to a calendar is I can set now recurring things that I know need to be done weekly. And so I just say, Okay, Tuesdays at 2:30 p.m. Are going to be the days that I do X y and Z. So if I want to block out time to engage on social media instead of just knowing like, Oh, I need to get around to doing that, I need to do that. I now know to 30 on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, or when I do that. And so it's been super helpful, not just for one off tasks but also recurring tasks for me. Well, yeah, and that's brilliant. I mean, when you work from your calendar, you can align to...

...your values and your energy. So you know, you start to schedule your brain work in the morning, your recurring appointments, whether that's, you know, for your body going to the gym or date night with your spouse. You know, those are just time blocks that happen over and over again, and it just changes the way we spend our time. Yeah, a lot of the ways that I get appointments on my calendar. I use a tool called Calendar early. I'm not sure if you are familiar with it, but it's cool because, you know, as we're scheduling these podcast interviews and we're you know, we're getting sales calls on the calendar, I just send my calendar to everyone, and I know that. Okay? You know, I keep using the engage on social media example, but I know that nothing is going to override that to 30 slot on a Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday because I've blocked it in my calendar. And so there's not gonna be a, you know, a call that pops up for a meeting. That happens because, like you said, like, you align your calendar with what your values are and you make sure that those are a priority and they actually happen because not like if you're using kindly as a as a means to get new appointments on your calendar, you get to control when those happen. And so when I heard your episode talking about it, I was like, Man, that is really, really good. Hey, everybody, Logan was sweet fish here. If you're a regular listener of GDP growth, you know that I'm one of the co hosts of the show, but you may not know that I also head up the sales team here at Sweet Fish. So for those of you in sales or sales ops, I wanted to take a second to share something that's made us insanely more efficient. Lately, our team has been using lead I Q for the past few months and what used to take us four hours gathering contact data now Takes us only one Where 75% more efficient we're able to move faster with outbound prospecting, and organizing our campaigns is so much easier than before. I'd highly suggest you guys check out lead I Q as well. You can check them out at lead. I q dot com That's L e a D i q dot com. Alright, let's get back to the show. So, Kevin,...

...this this next one that we're going to talk about is one that I think Mark Cuban told you. Can you impact that productivity tip for us? Yeah, it's, uh, you know, it was pretty funny, you know, I reached out, as I said to hundreds of entrepreneurs, and primarily I tried to reach him first, you know, through email and the majority didn't respond at all. I mean, it was it was like no response and others. It took a lot of time. Mark Cuban responded 61 minutes after I reached out to I mean, that's how dialed in. He is a master of time. He is now, you know, before I reveal his his answer. This was a common theme among the billionaires. They all sort of gave similar advice. So typical Mark Cuban fashion. I mean, very snarky. Kind of funny. His advice. I said, Give me your number one piece of advice for productivity time management. And he said, Never do meetings unless someone is writing you a check. So now you've got to assume, like, you know, Look, if you report to the guy, he's going to meet with you and you sure he's doing meetings for Shark Tank or whatever, But the sentiment came through over and over again. Dustin Moskovitz, the co founder of Facebook, another one of the billionaires. His company now is called Asana, and he said they have no meeting Wednesdays. So four other days of the week. If you gotta drown in meetings, that's fine. But let there be at least one day a week where it's the day to make stuff to work on. Stuff. To focus. Rory Vaden. You know he's got 100 person coaching company now does a lot on productivity. They flipped that Monday is meeting day. You can only hold meetings on Monday, the other four days a week. They've banned meetings. And so listen, you know, if you're running your own company or you're the boss, you can kind of, you know, say okay, no meetings in in the morning until after we make our cold calls or no meetings on Monday or whatever it is. But even as an individual, you know, we should try to stay out of meetings as much as possible. They are not very efficient when it comes to sharing...

...information or making decisions. So rather than just saying yes, we should try to stay out of them or at least condense them, do stand up, huddles, do walking meetings, anything to make them more productive and less timely. Yeah, that's that's really good advice. I like that a lot. And Kevin, we were talking a little bit off line before we started recording, and you were mentioning the most interesting or the most surprising thing that you actually learned while researching and writing this book about morning productivity. Yeah, you know, again, like I asked everyone just one open ended question. I didn't want to drive it. And so it's like, Give me your best productivity advice and I expected priorities or procrastination All this stuff. A lot of these people came back and said, How I spend my first hour in the morning sets the tone for the rest of the day, and mentally it's like ultra productive people. Every day is game day, and so they ain't messing around. They ain't playing right, so they're waking up now. They each have a slightly different routine, but they're all doing something for their body and for their mind. And, you know, from the people I interviewed and some of the research from, you know Gary Vaynerchuk to Arnold Schwarzenegger, Tony Robbins, John Lee do is I mean, they're all given this advice about Listen, you know, you wake up, you gotta drink water because you're dehydrated. Already, ultra productive people aren't skipping breakfast. Food is fuel. We need glucose in our brain to perform at our best, So eat a healthy breakfast and you don't have to go to Crossfit every morning. But like move for 20 minutes. And whether that's yoga or treadmill or whatever your thing is, get that blood flowing and similarly, I heard over and over again about mentally preparing for game day and for some that was praying for a lot of people. It's meditation. Others are reading their goals or looking at their vision boards. But it's the idea that you know, if you want to do more, you need to become more and so protect that first hour. If you've got to get up at...

...five, get up at five. But invest in your body. Invest in your mind so you can go in and then kill it on the phones, kill it with your customers and have that energy and focus throughout the day. That's really good, given. I've always struggled with having a consistent morning routine. Obviously, I'm not a billionaire, Uh, but as I I, because I've heard you talk about that idea on your podcast as well, and it's got me thinking one of the things you mentioned, what Mark Cuban does in the morning. Does he sit on his elliptical and just watch the news in the morning? Is that Is that what he does? You know, that was It wasn't Cuban, I think. Kevin O'Leary was was one of the ones that did that. And, um, several people were doing exercise bikes or or ellipticals while watching the morning news. Yeah, and I think that's one of the things. Like as I heard you talk about that, I thought, Well, it doesn't have to be overly complex. And I think in my head I've been making a morning routine like it needed to be this, you know, long drawn out, 14 step process. And whenever you were talking about how guys just get on their electricals and watch the news, that seems pretty easy, like, Oh, I could do that. But it's just that it's a matter of being consistent in it, getting your body going, getting, you know, obviously, like drinking water, eating breakfast and just doing something that gets you in the right frame of mind to to tackle your day. So often times I know I struggle with this. I set my alarm based on when I know my first call is going to be, or when I know my first meeting is going to be, and you just you end up getting frazzled. I gotta, you know, get my teeth brushing doesn't get 10 minutes and Then I get this call, and then you start your day in this kind of rushed state of mind. You're not attacking the day you're letting the day attack you in a sense. And so when I heard you talk about that in your podcast about man, that's really good. So thanks for sharing that with us, Kevin. Can I Can I actually ask you what your mourning process looks like? Yeah. You know, similar to James. I mean, I'm not naturally a morning person, you know, So I can't say I'm as...

...disciplined as some of these others. You know, most days, and I will admit the busier I am, the more likely I'm gonna be good at this because I know it helps in that same day. So I mean, most mornings I am waking up. I'm doing a protein shake with a handful of blueberries and spinach in it. I'm down in that and then I'll hop on that treadmill. I'll do some stretching and treadmill, and I'm usually listening to podcasts in the morning. And, you know, that's pretty guaranteed. Now, if I'm really at my best, I will sit down and do, like, five minutes of meditation. Even if I'm not doing meditation, I'm a big believer in having you know an attitude of gratitude. So I do like to kind of think of 23 things that I'm just grateful for for the day, and that's about it. I mean, I'm not as disciplined with the reading and the journaling and all those things, but I I definitely do the shake hop on that treadmill and then just try to quiet the mind for a few minutes. That's good, Kevin. You've shared some some awesome stuff with this. I know our time is coming down to an end, but if folks want to stay connected with you, what's the best way for them to go about doing that? Yeah, The easiest thing is, if they want to hop over the website master your minutes dot com, they can sign up for a free download of the Millionaire Day Planner and another cheat sheet called 15 Surprising Things. Productive people do differently, and that's the email list, and I'm on all the social media channels. Kevin Cruz The last name is K R U s e. Happy to answer any questions if anyone reaches out love it. Awesome. Kevin, Thank you so much for your time today, man. I really appreciate it. Thanks, guys. What a great conversation. Several things that I learned here, but one that I'm definitely taking away that I found super timely, Which was, to put it on the calendar. Picked the day. Pick the time, pick the duration, Get away from the to do list. That's my main goal for 2022. Great insights to consider as we head into the new year. Hey, if there's something you learned...

...here something that you're trying, I would love to hear about it. You can reach out on LinkedIn. Just search Benji Block. And thanks for tuning into this episode of B two B growth. If you aren't yet subscribed, do so on whatever platform you're listening to this on. And that's a great way to just make sure you never miss anything. Let's finish the year strong, Continue to do the work that matters, and we'll talk again soon. Gary V says it all the time, and we agree Every company should think of themselves as a media company 1st. Then whatever it is they actually do, if you know This is true, but your team is already maxed out and you can't produce any more content in house. We can help. We produce podcasts for some of the most innovative BB brands in the world. We also help them turn the content from the podcast and the blog posts, micro videos and slide decks that work really well on Linked in. If you want to learn more, go to sweet Fish media dot com slash launch or email Logan at sweet fish media dot com.

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