3 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management with Kevin Kruse

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The “hustle” isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

We’ve all heard about hustling and working hard, but what about working smart?

Billionaires like Mark Cuban and Richard Branson will tell you that time management plays a direct role in their success. From the first hour of their mornings to how they organize their calendars, they have learned how to own their day instead of letting their day own them.

In this episode, Kevin Kruse, NY Times Bestselling Author of 15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management, shares time management tips from some of the most successful billionaires in the world.

...accelerating value by proof. Analyticsis the podcast for marketing, communications, sales and operationsleaders who want to see their business value clearly and succeed. Learn howleaders are closing the gap between creative work and business impactthrough raw conversations. Don't believe me. Check out the show foryourself. From the CFO perspective, it's value is what type of revenuegeneration earnings, cash flow that is only adding to the growth of the of theenterprise. You know. Another dimension would be how our margins performing arewe? You know, we're getting the right value by seeing margin expansion bycreating products, services that are generating, You know, that incrementalvalue to the organization. And I think from my lens, you know that it'smonetary in many dimensions, right? It's not, you know, thinking about okay,what say from an employee perspective, other perspectives. But as a leader, asthe finance leader, as you're looking to grow the revenue, earnings and cashflow of an organization, it will only create more opportunities for youremployees, for your suppliers, for your customers, based on the services thatyou're creating. So to me, that's how I view to be value for more. Subscribe tothe show wherever you listen to podcast. Yeah. Welcome into another episode of B2Bgrowth. My name is Benji Block, and I want to let you know over the next fewepisodes we're doing something that I'm really excited about. Did you know thatbe to be. Growth has over 2000 episodes. In our archive. We have so much content,so much gold. And for some of you, you've just recently found the show orfor those that have been around for a while. It's like, man, I didn't realizeI've been listening for that long, right? Like there's just so much thatwe can learn from. And so I thought,...

Why don't we go back to some olderepisodes, Especially as we're about to head into 2022? Could we pull somethings that would be really helpful for our audience? And so today I'm excitedto bring you a classic episode. We sat down with Kevin Cruz And he gave usthree secrets. Successful people know about time management. I know timemanagement is something I'm personally reviewing thinking about as we headinto the new year, and I thought man for some of us. I'm sure this wouldjust be a timely conversation to revisit. So without further ado, let'sjump into this conversation that we had with Kevin Cruz. Welcome back to the B to B Growth Show.We are here today with Kevin Kruse. He's a New York Times best sellingauthor, and his last book is titled 15 Secrets. Successful people know abouttime management. Kevin, how you doing today, man? Doing great, James andhello, Jonathan. Thanks for having me on the show, Kevin. Thanks. Thanks forbeing here and really excited to chat with you, Kevin. I've actually beenlistening to your podcast and, uh, just getting a ton of helpful tips out of it.So I wanted to reach out to you And have you share some of these secretsfrom your last book with our audience. So but, Kevin, before we dive into that,I want to set some context. And you actually been in the B2B game, the bulkof your career? It sounds like and so could you tell our audience a littlebit about your background and what led you to doing what you're doing? A lotof now. Yeah, that's that's a great question. And others who are lesspolite basically say, like, Why the Why the heck do we need another book ontime management? And why did you spend your time writing it? And you're right.You know, I spent over 20 years as an entrepreneur starting and selling, Uh,some companies had several exits, and this book came from my own experience.I mean, when I was young and dumb in my twenties, you know, I really justbelieved it was all about the hustle.

And, you know, you want to have alittle bit of hustlers, nothing wrong with hard work. But my first company,it was a small exit when I was 30 years old. You know, I built a company up tojust over a million dollars in revenue, took me five years to do it. And I soldit for about $2 million. But I was working literally 80 hours a week.Sometimes more. I mean, seven days a week. I'd pull all nighters, and, youknow, I was just got to that point where, yes, there was some amount ofbusiness success, but it was at a tremendous cost to my health, myrelationships and looking back, I mean, how good of a boss could I have been?How good could I have been with clients when you know, I was getting four hoursof sleep at night, and I slowly learned from some mentors that it's okay towork hard, but it's more powerful to work smart. And it got to the pointwhere, with my last business, it was the exact same industry and everything.Same customers, same product base In five years. Instead of growing amillion dollar business, I grew a $12 million 40 hours a week. So from 100hours a week to about 30 hours a week, but revenue grew from a million to 12million a year, and it's all by just changing the way I worked. And so whenI sold that last company, I just decided, all right. You know, let mespend some time writing and speaking and talking to entrepreneurs and, um,time and productivity was one of the things that I, you know, thought Icould help give back on. That's incredible. And so so this last bookthat you wrote these 15 secrets, they're not just coming out of yourbrain. You've tapped the shoulders of some some pretty high profile people toget their secrets. Can you tell our audience a little bit about who yousought after to to really help you and inform the content for this book? Yeah.No, it's It's great. You know, I, um there's the subtitle. The book is thecraziest longest one ever. It's called...

The Productivity Habits of SevenBillionaires. 13 Olympic athletes, 29 Straight A students and 239entrepreneurs. And so you know, there's the billionaires include, you know,Mark Cuban and Mohammadou Jews, the youngest billionaire in Africa. Youknow, we've got all kinds of solo preneurs, so it's not just the big ones.We've also got solo preneurs. I got working moms. I mean everything inbetween. But it's the largest qualitative research base. And then Iinterviewed four. I did a survey study of over 4000 corporate professionals tokind of inform this book. It's the first time anyone's really done a trueresearch project on time and productivity. In this crazy age we'reliving in, that's good. That's good, Kevin. So I want to dive into thisepisode. We're going to talk about three specific things. Three of thesecrets, if you will, that successful people know about time management. Ithink it's gonna be really helpful for our audience. B two b founders B two bsales executives Who there never seems to be enough time in the day. And so aswe dive into this first one, I think it was one that Richard Branson actuallytold you. Can you share that that first one with us? Well, yeah. So you know,11 of the more controversial recommendations that came out of theresearch is basically that ultra productive people Don't use to do lists.And I started, you know, hearing that people were not mentioning the to dolist on these interviews. And as I did more research, I found one study thatshows that 41% of everything we put on the to do list is never done and to dolists because of something called the Zeiger Nick effect Can lead to morestress when we know we have things to do and no plan to do them. It eats awayat our subconscious, which is why we can, you know, work a 14 hour day, gohome, exhausted, and then we can't fall asleep all of a sudden. Now, what ultraproductive people are doing in this research base is their living fromtheir calendar. Like just that simple task of taking all your two DUIs andpicking a day, A time and a duration...

...dramatically increases the likelihoodyou're going to do them and reduces that stress response because your brainknows Hey, there's already a plan for that. I'm gonna take care of thatThursday at 3. 30. So you're not gonna be losing sleep over it now? Youmentioned Richard Branson. Now he actually picked a fight with me overthis in his blog recently. You know, he picked up on this recommendation andhe's saying that he likes using his to do list, and he's obviously abillionaire. That does. And I've challenged him, uh, to a $25,000 debate.I told him I'll give the money to to Virgin Unite. He clearly doesn't needthe money to his charity, and I said, Listen, give me 30 minutes, and I'msure that I'm gonna get you to give up your to do list and start living fromyour calendar. And his people just got back to me yesterday saying he'sreviewing my request up on the chest on his to do list. Exactly. Get back to befaster if you just live right? Right, That's also that's incredible. So So Ihave started recently doing this Kevin moving things from a to do list system.I was using trail Oh, you know, I got some value out of the to do list, but,like you said, like eventually, I think it worked for me for a few weeks, maybeeven a month, but I eventually just stopped going to that board entre ellobecause I it was stressing me out the number of things that I had to do onthat list. But the other thing that I've noticed from moving to a calendaris I can set now recurring things that I know need to be done weekly. And so Ijust say, Okay, Tuesdays at 2:30 p.m. Are going to be the days that I do X yand Z. So if I want to block out time to engage on social media instead ofjust knowing like, Oh, I need to get around to doing that, I need to do that.I now know to 30 on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, or when I dothat. And so it's been super helpful, not just for one off tasks but alsorecurring tasks for me. Well, yeah, and that's brilliant. I mean, when you workfrom your calendar, you can align to...

...your values and your energy. So youknow, you start to schedule your brain work in the morning, your recurringappointments, whether that's, you know, for your body going to the gym or datenight with your spouse. You know, those are just time blocks that happen overand over again, and it just changes the way we spend our time. Yeah, a lot ofthe ways that I get appointments on my calendar. I use a tool called Calendarearly. I'm not sure if you are familiar with it, but it's cool because, youknow, as we're scheduling these podcast interviews and we're you know, we'regetting sales calls on the calendar, I just send my calendar to everyone, andI know that. Okay? You know, I keep using the engage on social mediaexample, but I know that nothing is going to override that to 30 slot on aTuesday, Wednesday or Thursday because I've blocked it in my calendar. And sothere's not gonna be a, you know, a call that pops up for a meeting. Thathappens because, like you said, like, you align your calendar with what yourvalues are and you make sure that those are a priority and they actually happenbecause not like if you're using kindly as a as a means to get new appointmentson your calendar, you get to control when those happen. And so when I heardyour episode talking about it, I was like, Man, that is really, really good.Hey, everybody, Logan was sweet fish here. If you're a regular listener ofGDP growth, you know that I'm one of the co hosts of the show, but you maynot know that I also head up the sales team here at Sweet Fish. So for thoseof you in sales or sales ops, I wanted to take a second to share somethingthat's made us insanely more efficient. Lately, our team has been using lead IQ for the past few months and what used to take us four hours gathering contactdata now Takes us only one Where 75% more efficient we're able to movefaster with outbound prospecting, and organizing our campaigns is so mucheasier than before. I'd highly suggest you guys check out lead I Q as well.You can check them out at lead. I q dot com That's L e a D i q dot com. Alright,let's get back to the show. So, Kevin,...

...this this next one that we're going totalk about is one that I think Mark Cuban told you. Can you impact thatproductivity tip for us? Yeah, it's, uh, you know, it was pretty funny, you know,I reached out, as I said to hundreds of entrepreneurs, and primarily I tried toreach him first, you know, through email and the majority didn't respondat all. I mean, it was it was like no response and others. It took a lot oftime. Mark Cuban responded 61 minutes after I reached out to I mean, that'show dialed in. He is a master of time. He is now, you know, before I revealhis his answer. This was a common theme among the billionaires. They all sortof gave similar advice. So typical Mark Cuban fashion. I mean, very snarky.Kind of funny. His advice. I said, Give me your number one piece of advice forproductivity time management. And he said, Never do meetings unless someoneis writing you a check. So now you've got to assume, like, you know, Look, ifyou report to the guy, he's going to meet with you and you sure he's doingmeetings for Shark Tank or whatever, But the sentiment came through over andover again. Dustin Moskovitz, the co founder of Facebook, another one of thebillionaires. His company now is called Asana, and he said they have no meetingWednesdays. So four other days of the week. If you gotta drown in meetings,that's fine. But let there be at least one day a week where it's the day tomake stuff to work on. Stuff. To focus. Rory Vaden. You know he's got 100person coaching company now does a lot on productivity. They flipped thatMonday is meeting day. You can only hold meetings on Monday, the other fourdays a week. They've banned meetings. And so listen, you know, if you'rerunning your own company or you're the boss, you can kind of, you know, sayokay, no meetings in in the morning until after we make our cold calls orno meetings on Monday or whatever it is. But even as an individual, you know, weshould try to stay out of meetings as much as possible. They are not veryefficient when it comes to sharing...

...information or making decisions. Sorather than just saying yes, we should try to stay out of them or at leastcondense them, do stand up, huddles, do walking meetings, anything to make themmore productive and less timely. Yeah, that's that's really good advice. Ilike that a lot. And Kevin, we were talking a little bit off line before westarted recording, and you were mentioning the most interesting or themost surprising thing that you actually learned while researching and writingthis book about morning productivity. Yeah, you know, again, like I askedeveryone just one open ended question. I didn't want to drive it. And so it'slike, Give me your best productivity advice and I expected priorities orprocrastination All this stuff. A lot of these people came back and said, HowI spend my first hour in the morning sets the tone for the rest of the day,and mentally it's like ultra productive people. Every day is game day, and sothey ain't messing around. They ain't playing right, so they're waking up now.They each have a slightly different routine, but they're all doingsomething for their body and for their mind. And, you know, from the people Iinterviewed and some of the research from, you know Gary Vaynerchuk toArnold Schwarzenegger, Tony Robbins, John Lee do is I mean, they're allgiven this advice about Listen, you know, you wake up, you gotta drinkwater because you're dehydrated. Already, ultra productive people aren'tskipping breakfast. Food is fuel. We need glucose in our brain to perform atour best, So eat a healthy breakfast and you don't have to go to Crossfitevery morning. But like move for 20 minutes. And whether that's yoga ortreadmill or whatever your thing is, get that blood flowing and similarly, Iheard over and over again about mentally preparing for game day and forsome that was praying for a lot of people. It's meditation. Others arereading their goals or looking at their vision boards. But it's the idea thatyou know, if you want to do more, you need to become more and so protect thatfirst hour. If you've got to get up at...

...five, get up at five. But invest inyour body. Invest in your mind so you can go in and then kill it on thephones, kill it with your customers and have that energy and focus throughoutthe day. That's really good, given. I've always struggled with having aconsistent morning routine. Obviously, I'm not a billionaire, Uh, but as I I,because I've heard you talk about that idea on your podcast as well, and it'sgot me thinking one of the things you mentioned, what Mark Cuban does in themorning. Does he sit on his elliptical and just watch the news in the morning?Is that Is that what he does? You know, that was It wasn't Cuban, I think.Kevin O'Leary was was one of the ones that did that. And, um, several peoplewere doing exercise bikes or or ellipticals while watching the morningnews. Yeah, and I think that's one of the things. Like as I heard you talkabout that, I thought, Well, it doesn't have to be overly complex. And I thinkin my head I've been making a morning routine like it needed to be this, youknow, long drawn out, 14 step process. And whenever you were talking about howguys just get on their electricals and watch the news, that seems pretty easy,like, Oh, I could do that. But it's just that it's a matter of beingconsistent in it, getting your body going, getting, you know, obviously,like drinking water, eating breakfast and just doing something that gets youin the right frame of mind to to tackle your day. So often times I know Istruggle with this. I set my alarm based on when I know my first call isgoing to be, or when I know my first meeting is going to be, and you justyou end up getting frazzled. I gotta, you know, get my teeth brushing doesn'tget 10 minutes and Then I get this call, and then you start your day in thiskind of rushed state of mind. You're not attacking the day you're lettingthe day attack you in a sense. And so when I heard you talk about that inyour podcast about man, that's really good. So thanks for sharing that withus, Kevin. Can I Can I actually ask you what your mourning process looks like?Yeah. You know, similar to James. I mean, I'm not naturally a morningperson, you know, So I can't say I'm as...

...disciplined as some of these others.You know, most days, and I will admit the busier I am, the more likely I'mgonna be good at this because I know it helps in that same day. So I mean, mostmornings I am waking up. I'm doing a protein shake with a handful ofblueberries and spinach in it. I'm down in that and then I'll hop on thattreadmill. I'll do some stretching and treadmill, and I'm usually listening topodcasts in the morning. And, you know, that's pretty guaranteed. Now, if I'mreally at my best, I will sit down and do, like, five minutes of meditation.Even if I'm not doing meditation, I'm a big believer in having you know anattitude of gratitude. So I do like to kind of think of 23 things that I'mjust grateful for for the day, and that's about it. I mean, I'm not asdisciplined with the reading and the journaling and all those things, but II definitely do the shake hop on that treadmill and then just try to quietthe mind for a few minutes. That's good, Kevin. You've shared some some awesomestuff with this. I know our time is coming down to an end, but if folkswant to stay connected with you, what's the best way for them to go about doingthat? Yeah, The easiest thing is, if they want to hop over the websitemaster your minutes dot com, they can sign up for a free download of theMillionaire Day Planner and another cheat sheet called 15 Surprising Things.Productive people do differently, and that's the email list, and I'm on allthe social media channels. Kevin Cruz The last name is K R U s e. Happy toanswer any questions if anyone reaches out love it. Awesome. Kevin, Thank youso much for your time today, man. I really appreciate it. Thanks, guys. What a great conversation. Severalthings that I learned here, but one that I'm definitely taking away that Ifound super timely, Which was, to put it on the calendar. Picked the day.Pick the time, pick the duration, Get away from the to do list. That's mymain goal for 2022. Great insights to consider as we head into the new year.Hey, if there's something you learned...

...here something that you're trying, Iwould love to hear about it. You can reach out on LinkedIn. Just searchBenji Block. And thanks for tuning into this episode of B two B growth. If youaren't yet subscribed, do so on whatever platform you're listening tothis on. And that's a great way to just make sure you never miss anything.Let's finish the year strong, Continue to do the work that matters, and we'lltalk again soon. Gary V says it all the time, and weagree Every company should think of themselves as a media company 1st. Thenwhatever it is they actually do, if you know This is true, but your team isalready maxed out and you can't produce any more content in house. We can help.We produce podcasts for some of the most innovative BB brands in the world.We also help them turn the content from the podcast and the blog posts, microvideos and slide decks that work really well on Linked in. If you want to learnmore, go to sweet Fish media dot com slash launch or email Logan at sweetfish media dot com.

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